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Big name advertisers from Netflix to Google are paying as much as $7 million for a 30-second spot during the Super Bowl on Sunday. In order to get as much as a return on investment for those millions, most advertisers release their ads in the days ahead of the big game to get the most publicity for their spots. In the ads released early, actor Miles Teller dances to customer-service hold music for Bud Light, Will Ferrell crashes popular Netflix shows like “Bridgerton” in a joint ad for GM and Netflix; and Alicia Silverstone reprises her “Clueless” character for online retailer Rakuten.

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A Nevada prosecutor has said a former “Dances With Wolves” actor accused of sexually abusing Indigenous women and girls was grooming young children to replace his older wives when he was arrested in January. The prosecutor pointed to the new evidence as reason for Nathan Chasing Horse to remain in custody. The judge set bail at $300,000 and said the 46-year-old can't go home but must stay with a relative if he is released from jail. He would be electronically monitored and can't have any contact with the victims or minors. Chasing Horse's public defender says she's happy with the judge's decision and that she will point out weaknesses in the state's case at Chasing Horse's next court hearing later this month.

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The only Black designer belonging to Italy’s fashion chamber has withdrawn from this month’s Milan Fashion Week, alleging a lack of support for diversity and inclusion after the chamber   “abandoned” a project to promote young designers of color working in Italy. Stella Jean also announced a hunger strike until she receives assurances that young designers of color associated with her don't receive retaliation. The moves signaled a dramatic denouement of a nearly three-year-collaboration with the chamber to promote designers of color launched on the heels of the Black Lives Matters movement in 2020. The head of the fashion chamber said he regretted Jean's withdrawal and had appreciated her contributions to consciousness-raising in Italian fashion.

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Visitors to one of Florence’s most iconic monuments are getting a once-in-a-lifetime chance to see its ceiling mosaics up close thanks to an innovative approach to a planned restoration effort. The Baptistry of San Giovanni, opposite the city’s Duomo, is undergoing a six-year cleaning and restoration of the mosaics that decorate its interior ceiling vault. But rather than limit the public’s access during the process, officials have built a scaffolding platform for the art restorers that will also allow small numbers of visitors to see the mosaics at eye level. Visits begin Feb. 24.

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Walt Disney Co. has removed from its streaming service in Hong Kong an episode from its cartoon series The Simpsons that includes a reference to “forced labor camps” in China. The company declined to comment on why the episode, “One Angry Lisa” from The Simpsons’ 34th season, is not listed for the Disney Plus streaming service in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory. In the episode, character Marge Simpson takes a virtual spin class whose instructor, in front of a virtual background showing the Great Wall of China, says “Behold the wonders of China. Bitcoin mines, forced labor camps where children make smartphones.” Allegations of forced labor are sensitive in China.

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Rock star Bono, the family of Tyre Nichols and the 26-year-old who disarmed a gunman in last month’s Monterey Park, California, shooting were among the featured guests sitting with first lady Jill Biden at Tuesday’s State of the Union address. The White House says the guests were invited because they personify issues or themes President Joe Biden addressed in the speech, or they embody policies that are working for the American people. The Ukrainian ambassador to the U.S., Oksana Markarova, was a guest, as she was last year. The husband of Vice President Kamala Harris, Doug Emhoff, invited a 92-year-old Holocaust survivor, Ruth Cohen.

AP

A fan publication devoted to Bruce Springsteen says it is shutting down after 43 years, with its publisher saying he's been disillusioned by the talk about ticket prices for their hero's current tour. Backstreets, active as both a website and magazine, is unusual for its journalistic rigor while leaving no doubt of its fan worship. But its publisher wrote that complaints among some fans about high prices for the Springsteen tour that began in Tampa on Feb. 1 left people at Backstreets lacking enthusiasm. Springsteen has said that it's “no fun being the poster boy for high ticket prices,” but said pricing was in line with others in live music.

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Defense attorneys for actor Alec Baldwin are seeking to disqualify the special prosecutor in the case against him stemming from the fatal shooting of a cinematographer on a New Mexico film set. In a motion filed Tuesday in Santa Fe-based district court, Baldwin’s legal team argued Andrea Reeb’s position as a state lawmaker prohibits her under state law from holding any authority in a judicial capacity. Reeb, a Republican, was elected to the state House of Representatives in November. Prosecutors dismissed the motion as Baldwin's attorneys creating a distraction. Baldwin and the film-set weapons supervisor have both been charged with involuntary manslaughter in the 2021 shooting death of Halyna Hutchins.

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The sequel proved to be a heartbreaker for Wrexham’s Hollywood owners. The Welsh soccer club owned by celebrities Ryan Reynolds and Rob McElhenney lost its FA Cup replay with Sheffield United 3-1 after conceding two goals deep into stoppage time. Wrexham was the lowest-ranked team remaining in the famous old competition. A win would have set up a match in the fifth round with Tottenham and star striker Harry Kane. Instead there was despair for the team from the fifth tier of English soccer which has hit the headlines over the last two years after it was bought by Reynolds and McElhenney for $2.5 million in November 2020.

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Disney’s government in Florida has been the envy of any private business, with its unprecedented powers in deciding what to build and how to build it at Walt Disney World. Those days are numbered as a new bill released this week puts the entertainment giant’s district firmly in the control of Florida’s governor and legislative leaders. Some see it as punishment for Disney’s opposition to the so-called “Don’t Say Gay” law championed by Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis and the Republican-controlled Legislature. With Disney's loss of control comes an uncertainty about how Disney’s revamped government and the Walt Disney World resort, which it governs, will work together.