Editor's note: This article was published in Grand Traverse Scene magazine's Spring 2019 issue. Pick up a free copy at area hotels, visitor's centers, chambers of commerce or at the Record-Eagle building on Front Street. Click here to read GT Scene in its entirety online.

CARDINAL COAT AND OTHER STORIES

by Katharine Crawford Robey

Katharine Crawford Robey’s first short story collection delivers powerfully descriptive prose. Her stories center around connections between people and the love and pain in family dynamics — a young woman and her boyfriend torn apart by war, a long-married couple struggling with retirement, an adult daughter and mother’s strained relationship, to name a few. Three of her stories are set in Michigan: “On the Shore,” “Fireworks!” and “Great Northern Pike.”

ALEXIS ROCKMAN: THE GREAT LAKES CYCLE

by Dana Friis-Hansen

This book focusing on an ambitious new body of work by American artist Alexis Rockman (b. 1962) explores the past, present and future of the Great Lakes, one of the world’s most emblematic and ecologically significant environments. Rockman’s series, “The Great Lakes Cycle,” celebrates the natural majesty and global importance of the Great Lakes while exploring how they are threatened by factors including climate change, globalization, invasive species, mass agriculture and urban sprawl. Though positive action has been taken in recent decades to understand and counteract the environmental damage, this inspiring publication will serve to promote continued attention to these fragile ecosystems. The works in the series are based on Rockman’s research, travel in the Great Lakes region and conversations with scientists, historians and specialists. Included are large oil paintings, field drawings, a suite of watercolors and documentary material. The book’s essays relate this new work to historical and contemporary landscape art and address the significance of the Great Lakes ecosystem and what it can teach us beyond the region.

A COURSE IN FUN WITH FAST EDDIE

by Karen Wiand

When it seems like the road you’re on is dotted with potholes no matter where you turn, and the journey isn’t as fun as it used to be, it’s time to strap on your bike helmet and fall in line behind a bottle-picking, fun-loving guru who can show you a better route. Meet Fast Eddie, who, from all appearances, lost everything from the start, when he was found severely malnourished as an infant, leaving him with a lifelong intellectual disability. Eddie turned defeat on its head by showing up every day ready to live happily ever after, no matter what. By borrowing just a few tools from Eddie’s special toolbox, you will find yourself loosening your grip on the handlebars that are keeping you from having the ride of your life.

LAKE NATION: PEOPLE AND THE FATE OF THE GREAT LAKES

by Dave Dempsey

The more than 35 million people who live among the Great Lakes overwhelmingly profess devotion to these waters — yet the Lakes are in mediocre condition at best. Why the gap? Author Dave Dempsey seeks the answers not in political theory, but in personal narratives and dialogue. Some of the answers he discovers are surprising, some expected. Ultimately, he finds that for the Lakes to thrive, not just endure, the Lake Nation may have to redefine citizenship.

LAKE SUPERIOR TALES

by Mikel B. Classen

Pirates, thieves, shipwrecks, sexy women, lost gold and adventures on the Lake Superior frontier await readers in this book packed with action, adventure, humor and suspense. Sail on a ship full of gold, outwit deadly shapeshifters, battle frontier outlaws and even meet the mysterious agent that Andrew Jackson called “the meanest man” he ever knew. Journey to the wilds of the Lake Superior shoreline through 10 stories that span the 19th century through present day including “The Wreck of the Marie Jenny,” “The Bigg Man,” “Wolf Killer” and “Bullets Shine Silver in the Moonlight.”

A MAN AGAINST INSANITY: THE BIRTH OF DRUG THERAPY IN A NORTHERN MICHIGAN ASYLUM

by Paul De Kruif

Meet the man against insanity. His laboratory? The sadly sinister wards of the 3,000-bed Traverse City State Hospital. His apparatus? Only his own eyes and hands, plus the hands and eyes of more than 100 nurse attendants. And for his experiments, the patients whom staff referred to as the “cats and dogs” — the seemingly incurable psychotics resistant to all treatment and far beyond hope. In this book, originally published in 1957, author Paul de Kruif tells the story of Dr. Jack Ferguson, a family physician who originally made a name for himself by perfecting a three-minute lobotomy. In 1954 he arrived in Traverse City, ready to perform 500 lobotomies on the so-called incurably insane. Instead, using an unscientific combination of chemicals, copious notes and loving attention, he began one of the boldest drug therapy experiments ever attempted in a mental institution, helping to reshape how the mentally ill are treated in this country and abroad.

TORCH LAKE SUMMERS: GROWING UP AT CAMP HAYO-WENT-HA

by Craig Hupp

Dave Keena, the author’s father-in-law, attended Camp Hayo-Went-Ha on Torch Lake as a camper and counselor from 1934 to 1942. This partly fictional memoir follows him as he grows from a boy to a young man and leader during those nine summers. The reader shares Dave’s adventures from his first train ride to camp in 1934 to the last day in August 1942 when he shook hands with his best friend as they parted company in Detroit, heading their separate ways to war. In between, Dave learns that the hardest times can be the best times, that friendship and leadership demand we put others ahead of ourselves, and how sweet a kiss can be at a midnight rendezvous. The book includes photos of camp from the 1930s and over a dozen illustrations by camp alumni Rob Wilkinson. ■