Traverse City’s Cowell Cancer Center opened in 2016. Before and after the opening, I served on the center’s patient advisory committee. The majority of the committee members had personal experience with cancer — either as patients or family members. Like many people, a few of my loved ones h…

On Saturday, April 10, at 2 p.m. the Traverse City Human Rights Commission will host a free educational program on Zoom titled “Ein-biidaajimotaageijig (the ones who bring the news to the people): Reclaiming Identity in Everyday Endeavors” with the Mishigamiing Journalism Project. Featured s…

Back in 1978, my mom came home from shopping with a small package she had picked up that day. It was a small ceramic pitcher sitting in a ceramic bowl, kind of like a glorified cup and saucer. What made it special was that the pitcher was emblazoned with glitzy silver wording proclaiming “Ou…

I follow Alice Wong’s Disability Visibility Project. Recently, Alice posted a piece by Emily Wolinsky, president of NMD United, a nonprofit organization connecting adults living with neuromuscular disabilities. Emily and her family live in Texas. They lost power during the recent storms. In …

When we think of politicians, the typical descriptors are of the “one word” or “one issue” variety — Democrat, Republican, pro-this, pro-that, anti-another thing, Whig, Bull Moose, or whatever.

Many people go through life expecting the worst. Alfred Alder, the 19th century Austrian psychotherapist, stated: “Meanings are not determined by situations, but we determine ourselves by the meanings we give to situations.”

Sometime in the past, I imagine you stumbling across a “How to Apologize” article. In his book “On Apology,” Aaron Lazare writes that he analyzed the number of articles published each year and his data suggests that the interest in apologies is on the rise.

This year, people truly want a fresh start to their lives. For many, that includes the practice of making resolutions about their bodies, like losing weight, eating healthier and getting more exercise.

In the winter of 1965, a local second-grader was put into the small hospital in Frankfort for two weeks. His older brother, his mother and he were all sick and the doctor’s diagnosis was to get those kids out of the house so their mom could get some rest.

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