Traverse City Record-Eagle

November 6, 2012

Letters to the Editor: 11/06/2012


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Hay help is available

We've heard a lot lately about the challenges facing Michigan horse owners, rescuers, shelters and sanctuaries because of the hay shortage caused by last winter's drought. But the good news is that help is available: The Michigan Horse Welfare Coalition, a 501-c3 non-profit organization dedicated to helping equines and their owners in need, has a hay bank to provide assistance for those facing tough economic times.

Since our founding in January of 2010, the Michigan Horse Welfare Coalition has helped more than 300 horses in our state with feed, care and rescue. Many of those horses were right here in Northern Michigan. It's easy to get help; just visit www.MichiganHorseWelfare.org/hay-bank to read about our eligibility guidelines and to apply for assistance.

Remember that it is against the law to starve, neglect or abandon your horses, and there is no excuse to do that when assistance is available. Please spread the word about our hay bank to help ensure that Michigan's horses are well cared for over the coming winter. Find out more about our work at www.MichiganHorseWelfare.org.

Lori Bloink

Fife Lake

Fence provided security

I am disappointed with the recent removal of the fencing around the Traverse City Civic Center.

Those with young children and dogs should be concerned. I am particularly concerned for the dozens of special needs children who attend nearby Oak Park Elementary.

To these students, the Civic Center is not simply a walking path or playground. It is a learning environment. The students learn to stay together and respect others in public. Learning appropriate behavior is part of their everyday training.

Even with staff members present at all times, these children are prone to break away. The fence provided another layer of safety.

My son is one of those students.

Although the master plan does show that some fencing is staying, but lower, that is not enough. Fencing is needed around the entire facility like it was before the recent removal.

Shame on me for not attending the public brainstorming sessions that were held; however, it is difficult to attend something that I was not aware of.

It seems to me that the need for the fence was a given.

I am all for eye appeal and making the area more inviting. However, safety should not be sacrificed.

Denise King

Kingsley