Traverse City Record-Eagle

Michigan

January 24, 2014

Feds discuss Asian carp plan in Traverse City

TRAVERSE CITY — The federal government could more quickly implement a plan to keep the Great Lakes free of Asian carp if the region’s citizens and elected officials agreed on the best approach to take, a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers official said Thursday.

The Corps has been accused of dragging its feet since releasing a report this month listing eight options for preventing the voracious carp and other invasive species from moving between Lake Michigan and the Mississippi River watershed through Chicago-area rivers and canals. Several of the alternatives carry price tags exceeding $15 billion and would require 25 years to complete.

Dozens of speakers, from U.S. senators to sport fishermen, endorsed that approach during a public meeting in Traverse City — the fifth of nine gatherings the Corps is hosting with the White House Council on Environmental Quality to explain the report and get feedback.

Corps project manager Dave Wethington said such a massive reworking of Chicago’s waterway network would take a long time and carry a hefty price tag, requiring the construction of extensive tunnels and reservoirs to prevent flooding.

But he said the pace would be determined partly by how soon the region settles on one alternative, which would enable the Corps to do further planning while supporters seek funding from Congress and the states.

“Our organization is looking to have ... at least that consensus voice on the path forward prior to studying anything further, just to ensure that there is an interest in actually moving forward,” Wethington said in an interview.

Wethington said the agency has been meeting with state officials and members of Congress in addition to conducting the public meetings to get a feel for which option could gain the most backing.

The Corps has been impressed by the overwhelming support for physical separation and quick action at all the meetings, he said, although the first one in Chicago also featured impassioned pleas not to shut down waterways used by freight barges and tour boats. Illinois and Indiana business groups and elected officials also have spoken against physical separation and closing shipping locks, although Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn acknowledged last year that separation was “the ultimate solution.”

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