Traverse City Record-Eagle

Michigan

January 7, 2013

Michigan in Brief: 01/07/2013

Monroe hot dog vendor loses case

MONROE — After a three-year legal fight, a dispute over a Monroe hot dog stand is moving to a federal appeals court.

Owners of The Dog Pound are appealing a decision that dismissed their lawsuit against the city. They claim Monroe violated their rights by not allowing them to operate the hot dog stand in a busy downtown area.

Detroit federal Judge David Lawson recently ruled in favor of Monroe. He said The Dog Pound failed to offer evidence that an ordinance regulating transient merchants violates the U.S. Constitution.

The owners claim Monroe won't allow the hot dog cart in certain areas because other food businesses fear competition.

Couple in 80s slain in their home

KENTWOOD — Police in western Michigan say a husband and wife in their 80s were slain during an apparent invasion of their home.

Kentwood police identified the victims as 81-year-old David Bouwman and 80-year-old Vivian Bouwman. Police said they were found dead Saturday morning at a house in the Grand Rapids suburb.

Police ID suspect who was fatally shot

BELDING — State police have tentatively identified a western Michigan man they say was fatally shot after repeatedly firing at police cruisers.

Lt. Kevin Sweeney told the Sentinel-Standard of Ionia that he's believed to be 55-year-old Bernard Rowley of Sidney.

Police said the man fired shots before dawn Saturday outside the Belding police department, shattering the window of a department vehicle.

Program aim: Keep drugs out of water

PETOSKEY — An environmental group said a drop-off program in northern Michigan is helping prevent drugs from contaminating the region's waters.

The Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council in Petoskey said the program begun three year ago provides locations at law enforcement agencies where people can dispose of unwanted prescription and over-the-counter medicines and personal care products. Almost 5,000 pounds have been collected.

For many years, people were advised to flush unused drugs down the drain to avoid misuse. But scientists determined that pharmaceuticals were polluting waterways and called for other means of disposal.

Tip of the Mitt policy specialist Jennifer McKay said the network of drop boxes gives people a safe alternative. The boxes can be found at police agencies in Antrim, Charlevoix, Cheboygan, Emmet and Grand Traverse counties.

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