Traverse City Record-Eagle

Other Views

April 13, 2013

Another View: Handwriting is core, needs to be taught

Cursive writing may be considered too “old school” by some, but we believe removing the penmanship skills will shortchange our students in many ways.

In a series of stories by CNHI News Service and the Times-News published last Saturday, readers were told how there is a movement throughout the United States to no longer teach cursive writing to students.

So-called common core education standards approved by the National Governors Association and due to be implemented next year lay out standards for what students need to learn in today’s education environment. Those standards include proficiency in computer keyboarding by the fourth grade, but make no mention of the need for cursive writing ability, even though it has been integral to American culture since the nation’s founding.

While many educators believe cursive writing is no longer relevant and takes classroom time away from other subjects students should be learning, there remains a strong argument on the other side to keep cursive in the curriculum.

The National Association of State Boards of Education issued a policy statement last September to provide state school boards with unbiased research and analysis on the issue.

Some of the research found that there is educational value of handwriting in ways that go well beyond being able to read cursive or take notes without benefit of a handheld device.

The research suggests the practice and process of handwriting may improve students’ cognitive and motor skills development, enhance their literacy and help them retain what they’ve learned.

On the local level, the Times-News found that our educators continue to teach and support the handwriting form that they see as an important communication tool in American society.

There is no doubt that digital technology has had a major impact on the way we write and read. Personal computers, smartphones, tablets and e-readers are in abundance.

But handwriting still counts — in much the same way as mathematics skills are necessary even though most of us use calculators to compute numbers.

Cursive writing should keep its place in our classrooms.

Cumberland, Md., Times-News

 

 

1
Text Only

Facebook
Twitter Updates
Follow us on twitter
Associated Press Video
GMA: Dog passes out from excitment to see owner "The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1" Trailer is Here! Chapter Two: Designing for Naomi Watts Baseball Hall of Famers Inducted Florida Keys Webcam Captures Turtles Hatching Morgan Freeman Sucks Down Helium on 'Tonight Show' Robin Wright Can Dance! (WATCH) She's Back! See Paris Hilton's New Carl's Jr. Ad Big Weekend For Atlanta Braves In Cooperstown - @TheBuzzeronFox Chapter Two: Becoming a first-time director What's Got Jack Black Freaking Out at Comic-Con? Doctors Remove 232 Teeth From Teen's Mouth Bradley Cooper Explains His Voice in 'Guardians of the Galaxy' Deja vu: Another NYPD officer choke-holding a suspect 'Fifty Shades of Grey': Watch the Super Sexy First Trailer Now! Reports: Ravens RB Ray Rice Suspended For 1st 2 Games Of The Season Air Algerie plane with 119 on board missing over Mali Diamond Stone, Malik Newman, Josh Jackson and others showcase talent Free Arturo - The World's Saddest Polar Bear A Look Back at Batman On Film Through The Years