Traverse City Record-Eagle

History

July 1, 2013

News From 100 Years Ago: 07/01/2013

- OUTSIDERS MUCH IMPRESSED WITH PROJECT — They were especially pleased with condition of some Peninsula farms. Thomas S. Smith of Chicago and George A. Hawley or Hart, both of whom are big apple growers and sellers, passed through the city Saturday after an inspection of the apple orchards of the Leelanau and Grand Traverse peninsulas. Mr. Smith will be remembered as the man who bought a 40-acre apple orchard near Walkerville in Oceana County for $4,000 and in less than two years refused $42,000 for the same property. Mr. Hawkey is interested in the 75-acre orchard at Omena, which orchard has been put into production condition during the past five years. Both men were loud in their praises of the peninsula orchards, and took special pains to pay a compliment to Frank Edgcomb because of the splendid condition in which they found his several orchards.

- Chester Baird and Eugene Baird were hosts at a dancing party held at the hall here last Friday night. Music was furnished from Traverse City, and all the young people report a dandy time.

- Herbert H. Rood, speaker for the anti-saloon league, spoke to a full house at German Zion in Cedar Tuesday evening.

- REV. P.E. WHITMAN LOST LIFE AT HOLLAND – was well known in Grand Traverse region, where he held charges – Rev. Prentice E. Whitman, a prominent Methodist minister of this city, was drowned yesterday afternoon about 5 o’clock off Bigmal Point in Macatawa Bay. He was just starting on a fishing trip when the fatal accident occurred. The minister was pushing the boat from the landing, and had one foot in it. In some manner, he lost his equilibrium and plunged into the water, which is about 30 feet deep at this point. Disappearing beneath the surface of the bay, he never came up. In the boat at the time was Miss Mae Dender, a member of Rev. Whitman’s congregation, and the shock of her pastor’s death almost prostrated her.

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