Traverse City Record-Eagle

Food

March 6, 2014

Hummus drives chickpea boom

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — The rising popularity of hummus across the nation has been good for farmers like Aaron Flansburg.

Flansburg, who farms 1,900 acres amid the rolling hills of southeastern Washington, has been increasing the amount of the chickpeas used to make hummus by about one-third each year to take advantage of good prices and demand.

“I hope that consumption keeps increasing,” he said.

Lawmakers in the nation’s capital hope so, too. The new federal Farm Bill contains two provisions that are intended to boost consumption of chickpeas even more, along with their companion, so-called pulse crops peas and lentils.

Acreage devoted to chickpeas has exploded in the past decade in Washington and Idaho, which grow some two-thirds of the nation’s supply. Chickpeas require little water, and that’s a major plus in the dry region, Flansburg said.

“They work pretty well in our region,” he said.

In the Palouse region, which straddles both states, there are more than 150,000 acres producing chickpeas today, up from about 12,000 acres in 2000, said Todd Scholz of the USA Dry Pea and Lentil Council, the trade group for the nation’s growers.

Chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans, are also grown in California, Montana, North Dakota and other states, he said.

Historically, about 70 percent of the chickpea crop in this region was exported each year, Flansburg said. But that has changed because of the rising domestic demand for hummus, he said.

“That’s a good thing to have that balance,” he said.

The majority of the nation’s supply is consumed domestically, mostly in the form of hummus, Scholz said.

Farmers are currently getting about 28 to 30 cents a pound for chickpeas, which is an average price for recent years, Flansburg said. He’s seen prices top 50 cents per pound, but a big crop in India this year has pushed prices down a bit, he said.

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