Traverse City Record-Eagle

Life

December 12, 2013

Fancy meal without any fancy skills

Looking to dazzle your guests during the holidays? I’ve got the perfect “fancy” dish for you. And I promise it requires no advanced culinary skills.

I’ve adapted this from a recipe that first appeared in Gourmet magazine. It boasts a secret ingredient, what the French call a “farce,” but we call it forcemeat. It’s what makes this chicken ridiculously moist and flavorful.

A forcemeat is a mixture of well-seasoned meat, poultry, fish or vegetables, that is finely chopped or ground, then cooked and served alone or used as a stuffing. Some fat usually is added to ensure the forcemeat has a smooth texture. Forcemeat is the base of many charcuterie products, including pates, terrines and sausages.

But in this recipe, it doesn’t just add delicious flavor. It also insulates the chicken from the intensity of the heat in the oven, making it almost impossible for the meat to dry out.

For my forcemeat, I’ve used a mixture of chicken, spinach, low-fat sour cream (in place of the original recipe’s heavy cream), and Mediterranean flavorings, including lemon zest, nutmeg (often paired with spinach) and fennel seed. I’d advise those of you who think you hate fennel (which tastes vaguely of licorice) to give this combo a chance. It’s a delicious blend of flavors and you won’t even notice the fennel.

But before you get going, a few kitchen notes.

We’ll start with the tools. Your best bet for grinding the fennel seeds is a spice or coffee grinder, but you also can crush them with the bottom of a heavy saucepan. As for grating the lemon zest and nutmeg, get yourself a wand-style grater, which makes quick work of both.

If you’re using dry pre-washed spinach, throw a little water into the skillet with it to help it wilt, then stir it often. Don’t be surprised when it cooks down to almost nothing. You’ll notice then that the spinach has generated water of its own in excess. The best way to lose the water is to wrap batches of the spinach in a dish towel and squeeze hard.

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