Traverse City Record-Eagle

July 30, 2013

Panel backs lung cancer screening for some smokers

MARILYNN MARCHIONE AP Chief Medical Writer
Traverse City Record-Eagle

---- — the associated press

For the first time, government advisers are recommending screening for lung cancer, saying certain current and former heavy smokers should get annual scans to cut their chances of dying of the disease.

If it becomes final as expected, the advice by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force would clear the way for insurers to cover CT scans, a type of X-ray, for those at greatest risk.

That would be people ages 55 through 79 who smoked a pack of cigarettes a day for 30 years or the equivalent, such as two packs a day for 15 years.

Whether screening would help younger or lighter smokers isn’t known, so scans are not advised for them.

They also aren’t for people who quit at least 15 years ago, or people too sick or frail to undergo cancer treatment.

“The evidence shows we can prevent a substantial number of lung cancer deaths by screening” — about 20,000 of the 160,000 that occur each year in the United States, said Dr. Michael LeFevre, a task force leader and family physician at the University of Missouri.

Public comments will be taken until Aug. 26, then the panel will give its final advice.

Reports on screening were published Monday in Annals of Internal Medicine.