Traverse City Record-Eagle

News From 100 Years Ago

December 26, 2011

News From 100 Years Ago: 12/26/2011

• It's a surprise to know the amount of business done by the post office here when the size of Traverse City is taken into consideration. The amount of money handled in this office, besides the postage receipts, for the past year reaches $572,000, or over a half a million, while the sale of postage stamps amounts to more than $35,000.

• The case of Willis E. Wilson vs. Frank D. Nay is still on trial in the circuit court and will probably occupy the remainder of the day. The present indications are that court will continue all of next week as there are several more cases to be heard.

• From and after the first of next month, the new law firm of Tweddle and Boyd, composed of J. J. Tweddle and J. B. Boyd, will be open for business in the State bank building. The new firm succeeds to the business of Mr. Tweddle who for a number of years has enjoyed an extensive and increasing law practice.

• The Blem family have moved away from the Williamsburg community, part of them going to Indiana and the other to various parts of southern Michigan. Ben will remain in the Williamsburg area for a time.

• A meeting was held Wednesday by the seniors at the high school for the purpose of considering certain bids submitted by printing firms to publish the 1911-12 Senior Class Annual. Arrangements for the work of its compilation are already underway with the expectancy of the best annual ever put out by a local high school.

• The Masons of Northport are planning for a big time on the evening of December 27th, the occasion of the annual gathering of the local lodge. A banquet will be spread, preceded by installation ceremonies in the afternoon.

• Several hundred persons were probably startled at various times this week to see a queer looking craft floating or shooting along the surface of the water, either in the bay or river. The hydroplane consists of two hollow steel tubes which not only serve as floats but are also necessary to retain the craft's equilibrium. This odd affair is the work of a local young man, Charles Augustine.

• In a written spelling contest held in the third grade at the Elmwood Avenue School, Kenneth Alltand, Lillian White, Mary Meisner and Audrey Kalkstine had perfect papers. On the same day, all the children's faces beamed when it was announced that school would be dismissed in the afternoon because it was necessary to repair the furnace.

• Over one hundred ladies were very pleasantly entertained in the Park Place parlors Friday afternoon by Mrs. H. A. Musselman and Mrs. B. F. Kellogg. The rooms were decorated with greens, southern similax, holly wreaths and ropes of ground pine being used in profusion. A program of readings and musical numbers was presented followed by punch and refreshments.

• The heavy rains of Sunday raised the water in the pond at Mayfield to such a height that an accident to the electric light plant was only narrowly escaped. As it was, men with scrapers repaired the damage in a few homes.

• Frank B. Gannett, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Gannett of this city, has been awarded first prize in a window dressing competition for the best decorated pharmacy window in the state. Mr. Gannett is located in Detroit and his Traverse City friends will be interested in his success in his chosen line of work.

• Advice on deportment. Above all, a lady strives to be dignified and elegant in everything she does.

• Medical advice of a century ago. To treat rickets, good cow's milk, diluted by one-third to one-fourth of lime-water is the most suitable food.

• Best buy of the week. Felt Caps, Nothing Better, $2.00 - $12.00 at The Men's Fashion Shop.

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