Traverse City Record-Eagle

News From 100 Years Ago

April 25, 2011

News From ... 100 Years Ago: 04/25/2011

-- Although the Bureau of Associated Charities has been in existence but about two months, the ladies who have had working charge have accomplished most excellent results. As the meeting of the executive committee on Monday, the report presented was very satisfactory and shows the value of organized charity work.

-- A. Ringler, who has been engaged in the insurance business for the last five years, has devised a bath apparatus which will solve the problem of bathroom economy for a great many people. He has succeeded in accomplishing what he set out to do and believes that the apparatus will find a ready and extensive market. In a very short time, the factory will employ from 15 to 20 men at good wages.

-- Harry P. Harrison, of Chicago, has purchased the farm of Ely Firestone and the Drow farm at East Leland. Both of these places have frontage and there are about 400 acres in the property. The consideration was $12,000. Mr. Harrison intends to buy up a quantity of land and establish a lyceum colony.

-- The social given Friday evening for the benefit of Chan King and family at Wallin was well attended. The proceeds amounted to over $11. The community wishes to thank one and all for their generosity and help in this good cause in helping the Kings to repair their house which was recently damaged by fire.

-- George E. Sharpe, a well known citizen of Elk Rapids, came to the city Saturday for the purpose of having a little celebration and to make trouble for other people while in an intoxicated condition. He was particularly annoying to ladies at the Pere Marquette depot and his actions attracted the attention of Patrolman Ben Carson. An arrest was made and Mr. Sharpe will be spending his Spring vacation in the county jail.

-- Close West, who was found Wednesday morning in the barn at the Beitner plant, died at the Grand Traverse hospital Thursday afternoon from injuries, never having regained consciousness. The manner of his death is a mystery, as there are not witnesses as to the manner in which he received his wounds.

-- Many farmers in this vicinity are digging their last year's crop of potatoes. The reason of this unseasonable action being the fact that winter came so sudden that many acres were left in the ground during winter months. The condition of this crop was good when the snow disappeared, but the hard freezes these past few nights have left much of the crop in bad shape.

-- Eugene Cook has purchased A. Allen's stock of groceries and will open a store in the Hankinson Building at Bendon. He will fit up his store to include dry goods and shoes as well.

-- The rooms over the store of Mrs. J. I. Gibbs in Mayfield are being repainted and newly papered, preparatory to being occupied by Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Jackson. The work is expected to be completed by next Saturday.

-- Advice on deportment. Never be seen in the street without gloves. Your gloves should fit to the last degree of perfection.

-- Medical advice of a century ago. While occupied by a patient, the most effiacious disinfectants for the sick room are fresh air and scrupulous cleanliness.

-- Best buy of the week. One pair of mules, Weight 2400 pounds, $275 at Morgan's Livery.

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