Traverse City Record-Eagle

News From 100 Years Ago

November 14, 2011

News From 100 Years Ago: 11/14/2011

• The steamer City of Kalamazoo was burned to the water's edge Saturday evening while lying at her dock in Little Manistee Lake where she had put in for the winter. The fire, which is of unknown origin, was discovered about 6:30 o'clock. An alarm was immediately sent in by a passerby and the city fire department responded promptly but was unable to subdue the flames.

• Harry Nichols, employed by Hill & Hunt, while shingling on a one-story building on the west side yesterday, fell from the roof. Injuries to the extent of a badly shaken up condition and a sprained foot were sustained.

• Frank M. Paine has finished setting out bulbs at the Information Bureau gardens and early in the spring the two beds at the entrance of this picturesque place will be bright and beautiful. In all 480 bulb were planted and arranged so that the outer border will be white, the second red, then yellow. Those of the center will be a light pink.

• Word reached here today of the death of Louis Erickson, who accidentally shot himself while hunting with his brother. Erickson was taking loaded guns out of a wagon when one of them accidentally went off, blowing off a side of his neck.

• County Clerk White is busy sending out notices to the township clerks requesting them to be prompt in sending in their lists of births and deaths the first of the year. These lists have to be checked up at the clerk's office before township officers can draw their pay for the work. Last year, some of the settlements were not made until June which made a lot of unnecessary work in the clerk's office.

• Oliver Starbuck, Harry Starbuck, John Hendges and Pete Petersen, who all live in Grawn, went to Barker Creek Tuesday to work for the King Co. They are hopeful that it will be full time employment.

• S. E. Wait, the government observer here, furnishes the interesting information that Saturday, November 11, was the warmest November day recorded since 1885 when 70 degrees was registered. The highest Saturday was 69.

• Advice on deportment. A lady cannot refuse the invitation of a gentleman to dance, unless she has already accepted that of another for she would be guilty of an incivility which might occasion trouble.

• Medical advice of a century ago. Food should be given at intervals of two or three hours and must be both light and nutritious for a patient who has nervous prostration.

• Best buy of the week. Silk and Serge Dresses, Plain and Fancy Striped Messaline, $10.00 at The Barney Co.

The temperature fell to six above zero the same month 25 years ago, 1886.

• This is one of the years when the western Michigan farmer has occasion to rejoice as the price of potatoes is higher now that at the same time in several years. The high figure realized for this important crop in this section is a great benefit to all business industries as the towns are dependent upon the agricultural industries for their support.

• Miss Nettie Brodigan had the misfortune to pound a carpet tack in her finger Wednesday which caused a considerable amount of pain. Medical attendance was given and while the injury will incapacitate Miss Brodigan for some time, nothing serious will develop.

• Most everyone was called suddenly to their door when the White mill whistle gave the alarm of fire on Friday. It was E. Misner's feed barn that had caught fire. The engine came with the men to help and had the fire soon under control, then they went back to their work.

• Good roads and good prices make lively doings to the potato business. Four buyers are at Elk Rapids and the receipts are heavy. The price is around the 60-cent mark — a little more or a little less, according to quality.

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